Friday, March 12, 2010

Being Human in the 21st Century

Listening to Barry Taylor of Fuller Seminary -- and question is raised about what it means to be human in the 21st century.  Genesis speaks of humanity created in the image of God, but we're moving toward what he's calling (at this moment) the "techno-self."  We're moving in a direction where the line between human and technological is being blurred.

As a Star Trek fan, I'm reminded of the Borg (not Marcus).  With that image, what do we make of this question of our existence as humans?

So, how do we, as we do theology after google, how do we reflect theologically on humanity when this line is blurred? 


Allan R. Bevere said...


Woah! How intense. I would love to have a discussion on this, but maybe it would help to know where you are coming from.

Help me out, my friend...

Anonymous said...

Well, one example, for a few hundred bucks we'll soon be able to have our personal blueprints determined and drawn up (Personal Genome). I think all this twittering and such is a fad though. Personal privacy will push back eventually. David Mc

Pastor Bob Cornwall said...

I asked the question as I was listening to Barry Taylor speak this morning at the Theology after Google conference. He was sharing with us the ways in which the human/technological divide is already blurring, from prosthetics that really work to other technologies being embedded (or soon will be). So, I'm just tossing out the question, to see if folks might offer thoughts on the blurring of lines!

John said...

For me "image of God" implies the notion that we are the actual "offspring of God" like Seth was the offspring of Adam. We are not a thing to God and we are so much more than a mere creation of God, not like a pot or a coffee cup but a child of the "loins" of the creator - the connection is so deep and so incredibly intimate. When conceived in this way the nature of God's love for each of us becomes comprehensible to humans.

Being human in the 21st century means we have the opportunity to claim our birthright.