Sunday, October 23, 2016

Dinner Invitation -- A Communion Sermon

Revelation 19:6-10
Photo by Crystal Balogh

If you got invited to a big wedding banquet, would you get all excited? Would you see it as an opportunity to get all dressed up? Or would you wait to see if a better invitation came your way? I’ve been to a few wedding banquets in my time. Some were large and some small. Some were fancy and others were informal. Weddings are special events, and depending on your relationship with the couple, they might be can’t miss events.  

A few weeks back we heard Jesus tell a parable about a big banquet, which could have been a wedding banquet. In that story all the invited guests discovered that they had something better to do than attend the banquet (Luke 14:15-24). Our reading from Revelation 19 offers us another dinner invitation. This invitation is to the “marriage supper of the Lamb,” which takes place in the heavenly realm. The angel or messenger of God has declared that “blessed are those who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb.”  Yes, simply to be invited to this marriage supper is a blessing!

Friday, October 21, 2016

Table-Centered Worship and the Sermon

photo by Crystal Balogh
As I thought about what I might share this morning, I read Mark Love's blog post about shifting the locus of worship planning from sermon-centered to Table centered. Mark created a survey, which I participated in, that asked worship planners about their process.  The consensus was that planning on the sermon.  All of this was in preparation for Rochester College's annual Streaming Conference. After reading and interacting with Jamie Smith, Mark began to formulate a new paradigm.  

Mark is Church of Christ and I'm Disciples of Christ. We are of the same heritage, but different branches. Disciples have become more liturgical over time, especially since the 1960s. Still, we have share some habits that go back to earlier days -- prior to separation.  One of those habits is passing communion down rows.  

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Allegiances and Politics

I didn't watch the debate last night between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. I didn't watch the previous debates either, though I've followed along on Twitter and watched some of the analysis. At this point I'm not sure debates add much to the decision making of the voters. I know who I'm voting for, and have known for some time. This has been a most depressing election cycle, and many are disillusioned by the process. Politics and democracy itself can be and often is messy.  I made that point in one of the chapters of my book Faith in the Public Square. The choices we make and the votes we cast can be driven by a number of factors, including fear, that do not seek the best for all, but perhaps only for the few, including ourselves.  I wrote in that book:

In real life, numerous factors influence our choices, some of which may be less than honorable. It could be the way a candidate speaks or looks. We may take into consideration a candidate‟s gender, race, or age. Fear is a potent influence – and candidates and parties are very adept at manipulating them. Then there are the promises candidates make, promises that often pander to our prejudices or sense of entitlement. Too often we vote our own self-interest at the expense of our neighbors. That is, altruism often takes a back seat to me-firstism. We may voice our support for the biblical premise that calls on us to love our neighbor as we love ourselves, but too often love of self comes before love of neighbor.  [Faith in the Public Square, p. 101].
As we enter the final stretch of this election season, I would ask those of us who are people of faith to consider our allegiances. If I believe, as I do, that God is my ultimate allegiance then how should that work itself out in life? How should it guide my votes? And as I ask that question, of course, I need to take into consideration my understanding of God's nature. For me that means recognizing that love of God is partnered with love of neighbor, and neighbor isn't just the person who looks like me, thinks like me, talks like me. My neighbor might be the person I vehemently disagree with. My neighbor might be that politician for whom I have no political regard. Nonetheless that candidate, that politician, was created in the image of God and is one whom God loves.  

There are no perfect candidates. We may have to live with decisions that others make that we disagree with. That said, may that principle of ultimate allegiance, which is ensrined in the Lord's Prayer, guide us as we make political decisions. May our commitment be to find a way through they messiness of politics to a decision that best reflects God's vision of love of neighbor.  

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

InterVarsity Blues -- Sightings (Martin Marty)

I am strongly supportive of full inclusion of LGBT persons in church and society. I also have evangelical roots and am the graduate twice over of the leading evangelical seminary in the world. I value much from my past, but also stand apart from it on a number of issues, including this one. Hearing of the decision by InterVarsity to dismiss all employees who support same-sex marriage saddens me. Perhaps this is the last stand on this issue, but I believe it is a futile one as millennials by and large have moved away from such views. It is good to see, however, that numerous InterVarsity Press authors are opposing the move, and that is good to know as IVP produces some really good books! Martin Marty takes a look at the aftermath, offering some helpful words about how we might move forward. Take a read and offer your thoughts.

InterVarsity Blues
By MARTIN E. MARTY   October 17, 2016
Students pray during an InterVarsity Christian Fellowship gathering at Roanoke College in Salem, Va. | Photo credit: Roanoke College / Flickr via Wikimedia Commons (CC)
The world of Evangelical higher education keeps making news. Wheaton College in Illinois recently dealt with a flap over a faculty member’s theological comments about Christianity and Islam. She is no longer at Wheaton. And last week, the InterVarsity Christian Fellowship received some unwelcome attention. IVCF is an exemplary Evangelical organization which flourishes on 667 (!) college campuses nationwide. Its leadership announced that the Fellowship would begin “‘involuntarily terminating’ employees who hold a theological position supporting gay marriage.”

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Righteous Humility - Lectionary Reflection for Pentecost 23C

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: 10 “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. 12 I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’ 13 But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’14 I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

                What does it mean to be righteous? Does it mean that you are religiously devout and follow all the protocols of the faith to the letter? Or does it involve humble submission to God? These are questions that emerge from this parable. It’s one encounter and one more parable that redefines what God is looking for from us. The characters in the parable stand as far apart as is possible in ancient Jewish culture. The Pharisees were upstanding religious leaders; tax collectors were not only collaborators with the Romans they often robbed from their own people to benefit Rome and themselves. The Pharisees were respected; tax collectors were reviled. It should be noted that both Pharisees and tax collectors tended to be wealthy. We know where the tax collectors got their wealth. It's less clear how a Pharisee got his wealth, though perhaps it was inherited wealth.