Wednesday, October 22, 2008

Who's a True American?

A Congresswoman from Minnesota suggested that the press check out who in Congress is truly "pro-American" and who isn't. Sarah Palin has spoken about visiting parts of the country that are truly pro-American -- mainly small towns and rural areas, as opposed to urban areas. Immigration hasn't been touched upon much in the election, but it's another component. Suggestions that America is a Christian nation suggests that those who aren't Christina are somehow not truly American -- or at least they're second class citizens. There are those who suggest that a Muslim can't be trusted to lead the nation.

Since early in the primary season, there has been a whisper campaign suggesting that Barack Obama isn't a true American or isn't patriotic. Remember the absent flag pin? Of course John McCain doesn't wear one (though Gov. Palin wears one big enough all of them). Of course, he's a socialist (and no good American can be a socialist), he's a Muslim, he's an Arab, he's a racist Black radical, he pals around with terrorists . . . need I go on.

It is a sad fact of American life that we regularly question people's loyalty to the nation. If it's not as hot or fervent in its rhetoric as some others, then they're not sufficiently patriotic. But is such patriotism a virtue? Is putting "country first" necessarily a good thing? Remember, Americans aren't the only one's who love their country. Russians love their country. Nationalism fuels many of our crises in the world today.

Colin Powell said it well:

This business from the congresswoman from Minnesota saying, let's examine all congressman to see who is pro-American or not pro-American. We've got to stop this kind of nonsense and pull ourselves together. And remember that our great strength is in our unity and diversity and so, that really was driving me.


Let's stop questioning if someone is sufficiently pro-American or not. I have significant disagreements with the Republican Party. But I think it inappropriate to question the patriotism of its members. Let us remember who we are. We are more than Republicans or Democrats or Independents. We come from across the globe. Some of us trace back our ancestry to colonial times, while others are first generation immigrants. Whatever our background we should remember our national motto: E Pluribus Unum -- Out of the Many, One. This is a motto that I think we too easily forget -- and to our detriment as a nation.


3 comments:

Brad Hart said...

I could not agree more! BTW, Pastor, I wanted to let you know about an old blog of mine that I have "resurrected" entitled the American Revolution Blog (http://americanrevolutionblog.blogspot.com). Please feel free to check it out when you have the time!

Anonymous said...

Great post.. and sadly I think our "entertainment" culture has pushed us to this. We no longer ask what their positions are, just look at the D or R by their name and know all their positions. I wish there were true Mavericks.. on either side. Sadly, its walk the party line.. and then the "pundits" for each side simply spin their position. Its why I push for a third party. Personally, I am tired of the football game mentality where you love your team and hate the other.. regardless of the position.

Pastor Bob Cornwall said...

I don't think a third party is in the cards, but I do think we need to move beyond the polarization that has emerged in the last quarter century. Campaigns have always been nasty, but the campaign professionals have learned to niche candidates, so primaries often produce the most extreme candidates. Moderates find it difficult to win. There once were large numbers of northern moderate Republicans, they're almost extinct. And moderate Democrats, though more plentiful, are getting fewer over time.

So, maybe what we need is a process that allows for moderates to emerge. I say that as a liberal with a moderate streak!

Though I don't agree with a lot of the book, You might be interested in We the Purple by Marcia Ford.